New Aircraft For Noshahr Training Base (B737-500)

New Aircraft For Noshahr Training Base (B737-500)

Boeing 737
The Boeing 737 is a short- to medium-range twinjet narrow-body airliner. Originally developed as a shorter, lower-cost twin-engined airliner derived from Boeing’s 707 and 727, the 737 has developed into a family of ten passenger models with a capacity of 85 to 215 passengers. The 737 is Boeing’s only narrow-body airliner in production, with the 737 Next Generation (-700, -800, and -900ER) variants currently being built. Production has also begun on the re-engined and redesigned 737 MAX, which is set to enter service in 2017.

Originally envisioned in 1964, the initial 737-100 made its first flight in April 1967 and entered airline service in February 1968 at Lufthansa.[4][5] Next, the lengthened 737-200 entered service in April 1968. In the 1980s Boeing launched the -300, -400, and -500 models, subsequently referred to as the Boeing 737 Classic series. The 737 Classics added capacity and incorporated CFM56 turbofan engines along with wing improvements.

In the 1990s, Boeing introduced the 737 Next Generation, with multiple changes including a redesigned, increased span laminar flow wing, upgraded “glass” cockpit, and new interior. The 737 Next Generation comprises the four -600, -700, -800, and -900 models, ranging from 102 ft (31.09 m) to 138 ft (42.06 m) in length. Boeing Business Jet versions of the 737 Next Generation are also produced.

The 737 series is the best-selling jet commercial airliner.[4] The 737 has been continuously manufactured by Boeing since 1967 with 9,048 aircraft delivered and 4,428 orders yet to be fulfilled as of May 2016.[1] 737 assembly is centered at the Boeing Renton Factory in Renton, Washington. Many 737s serve markets previously filled by 707, 727, 757, DC-9, and MD-80/MD-90 airliners, and the aircraft currently competes primarily with the Airbus A320 family.[6] As of 2006, there were an average of 1,250 Boeing 737s airborne at any given time, with two departing or landing somewhere every five seconds.
737 Classic series
Main article: Boeing 737 Classic
The Boeing 737 Classic is the name given to the -300/-400/-500 series of the Boeing 737 after the introduction of the -600/700/800/900 series. The Classic series was originally introduced as the ‘new generation’ of the 737 . Produced from 1984 to 2000, 1,988 aircraft were delivered.
Cockpit crew : Two
Seating capacity : 140 – 188 (maximum) , 108 – 146 (2-class, typical)
Length : 102–120 ft (31–37 m)
Wingspan : 94 ft 9 in (28.88 m)
Wing area : 105.4 m2 (1,135 sq ft)
Cruising speed : Mach 0.74 (485 mph, 780 km/h)
Maximum speed : Mach 0.82 (544 mph, 876 km/h)
Takeoff field length (MTOW, SL, ISA) : 7,550–8,500 ft (2,300–2,590 m)
Maximum range, fully loaded : 2,270–2,400 nmi (4,200–4,440 km; 2,610–2,760 mi)
Maximum fuel capacity : 5,311 US gal (20,100 l; 4,422 imp gal)
Service ceiling : 37,000 ft (11,300 m)
Engines (×2) : CFM International CFM56-3 series
Thrust (×2) : 20,000–23,500 lbf (89–105 kN)