7th Anniversary

7th Anniversary

Happy anniversary! Thank you for the all of the contributions you made in making our company succesful. Kind Regards,
Boeing 777-300ER

Boeing 777-300ER

Boeing 777
The Boeing 777 is a family of long-range wide-body twin-engine jet airliners developed and manufactured by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. It is the world’s largest twinjet and has a typical seating capacity for 314 to 451 passengers, with a range of 5,235 to 9,500 nautical miles (9,695 to 17,594 km). Commonly referred to as the “Triple Seven”,[3][4] its distinguishing features include the largest-diameter turbofan engines of any aircraft, six wheels on each main landing gear, fully circular fuselage cross-section,[5] and a blade-shaped tail cone.[6] Developed in consultation with eight major airlines, the 777 was designed to replace older wide-body airliners and bridge the capacity difference between Boeing’s 767 and 747. As Boeing’s first fly-by-wire airliner, it has computer-mediated controls. It was also the first commercial aircraft to be designed entirely with computer-aided design.

The 777 is produced in two fuselage lengths as of 2014. The original 777-200 variant entered commercial service in 1995, followed by the extended-range 777-200ER in 1997. The stretched 777-300, which is 33.25 ft (10.1 m) longer, followed in 1998. The longer-range 777-300ER and 777-200LR variants entered service in 2004 and 2006 respectively, while the 777F, a freighter version, debuted in February 2009; these variants all feature General Electric GE90 engines and extended raked wingtips. The earlier 777-200, -200ER and -300 versions are equipped with GE90, Pratt & Whitney PW4000, or Rolls-Royce Trent 800 engines. The 777-200LR is the world’s longest-range airliner, able to fly more than halfway around the globe, and holds the record for the longest distance flown non-stop by a commercial aircraft.[7][8]

The 777 first entered commercial service with United Airlines on June 7, 1995. It has received more orders than any other wide-body airliner; as of May 2016, 60 customers had placed orders for 1,897 aircraft of all variants, with 1,401 delivered.[1] The most common and successful variant is the 777-300ER with 651 delivered and 800 orders;[1] Emirates operates the largest 777 fleet, with 144 passenger and freighter aircraft as of July 2015.[9] The 777 has been involved in five hull losses as of October 2015; the Asiana Airlines Flight 214 accident in July 2013 was its first fatal crash in 18 years of service.

The 777 ranks as one of Boeing’s best-selling models. Airlines have acquired the type as a comparatively fuel-efficient alternative to other wide-body jets and have increasingly deployed the aircraft on long-haul transoceanic routes. Direct market competitors include the Airbus A330-300, newly launched Airbus A350 XWB, and the out-of-production A340 and McDonnell Douglas MD-11. The 787 Dreamliner, which entered service in 2011, shares design features with the 777. In November 2013, Boeing announced the development of upgraded 777-8 and 777-9 variants, collectively named 777X, featuring composite wings and GE9X engines and further technologies developed for the 787. The 777X series is planned to enter service by 2020.

Airbus 320-300

Airbus 320-300

Airbus 320
The Airbus A320 family consists of short- to medium-range, narrow-body, commercial passenger twin-engine jet airliners manufactured by Airbus. The family includes the A318, A319, A320 and A321, as well as the ACJ business jet. The A320s are also named A320ceo (current engine option) after the introduction of the A320neo.[6] Final assembly of the family takes place in Toulouse, France, and Hamburg, Germany. A plant in Tianjin, China, has also been producing aircraft for Chinese airlines since 2009,[7] while a final assembly facility in Mobile, Alabama delivered its first A321 in April 2016.[8] The aircraft family can accommodate up to 220 passengers and has a range of 3,100 to 12,000 km (1,700 to 6,500 nmi), depending on model.

The first member of the A320 family—the A320—was launched in March 1984, first flew on 22 February 1987, and was first delivered in March 1988. The family was soon extended to include the A321 (first delivered 1994), the A319 (1996), and the A318 (2003). The A320 family pioneered the use of digital fly-by-wire flight control systems, as well as side-stick controls, in commercial aircraft. There has been a continuous improvement process since introduction.

As of 29 February 2016, a total of 6,932 Airbus A320-family aircraft have been delivered, of which 6,631 are in service. In addition, another 5,531 airliners are on firm order. It ranked as the world’s fastest-selling jet airliner family according to records from 2005 to 2007, and as the best-selling single-generation aircraft programme.[9][10] The A320 family has proved popular with airlines including low-cost carriers such as EasyJet, which purchased A319s and A320s to replace its 737 fleet. As of 31 March 2016, American Airlines was the largest operator of the Airbus A320 family aircraft, operating 362 aircraft.[b][4] The aircraft family competes directly with the 737 and has competed with the 717, 757, and the MD-80/MD-90.

In December 2010, Airbus announced a new generation of the A320 family, the A320neo (new engine option).[11] The A320neo offers new, more efficient engines, combined with airframe improvements and the addition of winglets, named Sharklets by Airbus. The aircraft will deliver fuel savings of up to 15%. As of January 2016, a total of 4,508 A320neo family aircraft had been ordered by more than 70 airlines, making it the fastest ever selling commercial aircraft.[12] The first A320neo was delivered to Lufthansa on 20 January 2016 and it entered service on 25 January 2016.[13][14]

Fokker 100

Fokker 100

The Fokker 100 is a medium-sized, twin-turbofan airliner from Fokker. Low operational costs and scant competition in the 100-seat, short-range class led to strong sales when it was introduced in the late 1980s, but sales fell as competition increased. Production ended in 1997 with 283 airframes delivered. In July 2012, 156 Fokker 100 aircraft remained in airline service with 30 airlines around the world.[1] It was the largest jet airliner built by Fokker before its bankruptcy in 1996.

6th Anniversary

6th Anniversary

Happy anniversary!
Thank you for the all of the contributions you made in making our company succesful.

Kind Regards,

1st VFR EVENT, SUMMER 19

1st VFR EVENT, SUMMER 19

Due to start of Summer, Qeshm Virtual Airline is planning to start weekly events, as the goals of this event is to train group flying and raise the level of scientific knowledge of the pilots. This event has different oreintaions and destinations each week.
For the 1st week we planned VFR flight around “Noshahr” Airport (OINN). In this flight each pilot will depart from Noshahr airport and continue to specified points around this airport, Now pilots will find airport and continue to “Runway Downwind” with aircraft instruments.
This procedure will take 1 hour and during flight all flight principles of each pilot will be evaluated and in the end each pilot will receive their points.

Best Regards,

Boeing 747-400

Boeing 747-400

The Boeing 747-400 is a major development and the best-selling model of the Boeing 747 family of jet airliners. While retaining the four-engine wide-body layout of its predecessors, the 747-400 embodies numerous technological and structural changes to produce a more efficient airframe. Its most distinguishing features versus preceding 747 models are 6-foot (1.8 m) winglets mounted on 6-foot (1.8 m) wing tip extensions, which are found on all 747-400s except for Japanese domestic market versions.

The 747-400 is equipped with a two-crew glass cockpit, which dispenses with the need for a flight engineer, along with more fuel-efficient engines, an optional fuel tank in the horizontal stabilizer, and revised fuselage/wing fairings. The aircraft also features an all-new interior with upgraded in-flight entertainment architecture. As on the 747-300, passenger variants include a stretched upper deck as standard. The model has a maximum capacity of 660 passengers with the 747-400D variant,[4] and can fly non-stop for up to 7,670 nautical miles (14,200 km) with maximum payload, depending on model.

Northwest Airlines first placed the 747-400 in commercial service in February 9, 1989. The 747-400 was produced in passenger (−400), freighter (−400F), combi (−400M), domestic (−400D), extended range passenger (−400ER) and extended range freighter (−400ERF) versions. The last 747−400, a -400ERF, was delivered in 2009.[5] The 747-400 is the second-most recent version of the Boeing 747 family, having been superseded by the improved Boeing 747-8.

Boeing 747-8i

Boeing 747-8i

The Boeing 747-400 is a major development and the best-selling model of the Boeing 747 family of jet airliners. While retaining the four-engine wide-body layout of its predecessors, the 747-400 embodies numerous technological and structural changes to produce a more efficient airframe. Its most distinguishing features versus preceding 747 models are 6-foot (1.8 m) winglets mounted on 6-foot (1.8 m) wing tip extensions, which are found on all 747-400s except for Japanese domestic market versions.

The 747-400 is equipped with a two-crew glass cockpit, which dispenses with the need for a flight engineer, along with more fuel-efficient engines, an optional fuel tank in the horizontal stabilizer, and revised fuselage/wing fairings. The aircraft also features an all-new interior with upgraded in-flight entertainment architecture. As on the 747-300, passenger variants include a stretched upper deck as standard. The model has a maximum capacity of 660 passengers with the 747-400D variant,[4] and can fly non-stop for up to 7,670 nautical miles (14,200 km) with maximum payload, depending on model.

Northwest Airlines first placed the 747-400 in commercial service in February 9, 1989. The 747-400 was produced in passenger (−400), freighter (−400F), combi (−400M), domestic (−400D), extended range passenger (−400ER) and extended range freighter (−400ERF) versions. The last 747−400, a -400ERF, was delivered in 2009.[5] The 747-400 is the second-most recent version of the Boeing 747 family, having been superseded by the improved Boeing 747-8.